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Sustainability

Amidst a world overflowing with mass-produced goods, it’s becoming all too apparent that quality, sustainability, and our planet’s welfare are often sacrificed in the pursuit of profits. The rampant use of harmful materials such as petroleum-based plastics and toxic business practices are just a few examples of the negative impact that these products have on our environment and society. But at DragonWear, we are determined to make a difference. We refuse to be just another brand contributing to this problem. We believe that everyone deserves access to products that are made with integrity, designed to last, and created with the utmost respect for our planet.

Sustainability with hemp

Hemp

At DragonWear we prioritize environmentally friendly materials, and that's why hemp is our main choice. Hemp is highly sustainable, with fast growth, CO2 absorption, soil cleansing, and minimal water needs. It requires no harmful chemicals, making it eco-friendly.

 

Additionally, hemp yields robust fibers, ensuring our products are durable and long-lasting. We are dedicated to crafting high-quality, sustainable apparel that contributes positively to the planet.

The Issues We are Addressing

Fast fashion

Fast fashion

The fashion industry is built on a business model known as fast fashion, which prioritizes speed and trend-chasing over sustainability and ethical practices. This model involves rapidly producing clothing and accessories as soon as new trends emerge, in order to capitalize on the high demand for these products. The negative impacts of fast fashion are numerous, from the exploitation of workers to the pollution of our planet. It is a major contributor to carbon emissions, as well as water and air pollution. The pressure to produce clothing quickly and cheaply has also led to poor working conditions for laborers, who are often underpaid and overworked.

Deforestation

Deforestation

The clearing of forests for agriculture, timber, and livestock farming has been a persistent practice throughout history. However, deforestation has led to significant changes in the landscape. Currently, deforestation is rampant in tropical rainforests, driven primarily by road construction in previously inaccessible areas. The practice leads to massive exploitation of the forests, with much of the land being burned down to create ash for fertilization of future crops. The soil is only fertile for a few years, after which the farmers move on to repeat the process elsewhere. The forests are also cleared for logging, livestock farming, palm oil plantations, and rubber trees. The impact on global CO2 emissions, photosynthesis, biodiversity, and soil erosion is significant. Furthermore, the clearing of vast tracts of forests has a significant impact on the climate.

Plastic pollution

Plastic pollution

Despite a growing population, plastic demand remains high, impacting aquatic environments like the sea. Marine mammals, such as whales and dolphins, mistake plastic for food, increasing mortality rates. This threat extends to endangered animals like green turtles, contributing to biodiversity decline. Migratory birds also face danger from floating plastic during their journeys. Microplastics, resulting from plastic degradation, pose threats to tiny ocean organisms, entering the food chain. Zooplankton, vital for many fish species, ingest microplastics, potentially reaching the human food chain. Microplastics can also harm air and water, affecting biodiversity and human health.

Desertification

Desertification

Desertification refers to the process of land degradation caused by various factors, including changes in weather patterns and human activities. It is a significant issue that results in the conversion of fertile land into arid desert lands or drylands due to a variety of changes.

Several factors contribute to desertification, such as climate change, excessive use of freshwater resources, deforestation, natural disasters, and unsustainable agricultural practices. The latter includes practices such as intensive tillage and the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. These practices lead to soil degradation and desertification and pose significant health risks to people consuming food grown on contaminated soils.

Clean water shortage

Clean water shortage

Although water covers 70% of our planet, access to clean drinking water remains a major challenge. Only 3% of water on Earth is fresh, with two-thirds of this water locked in frozen glaciers or otherwise inaccessible to humans. This means that 1.1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water.

Human activities are placing an increasing strain on the water systems that sustain ecosystems & our needs. Rivers, lakes, and reservoirs are being depleted or contaminated due to pollution and overuse. Agriculture, which consumes the most water, is also highly inefficient. Additionally, climate change is exacerbating extreme weather events, leading to more frequent droughts, floods, and other water-related crises.

Mass consumerism

Mass consumerism

Consumerism is the driving force behind this unsustainable business model. Many people treat clothing and accessories as disposable items, discarding them after only a few weeks or months due to changing trends or personal preferences. The low prices of fast fashion products make it easy for consumers to justify this behavior, as they can simply buy a new item for a few euros without considering the environmental and social costs. However, these discarded items end up in landfills and natural habitats, contributing to the pollution of our planet. Mountains of waste accumulate, and the contents of these landfills flow into the seas, rivers, and lakes, poisoning the land and the ecosystem.

How do you recognize fast fashion?

Limited quantities of a particular item. With new products arriving in the shop every few days, customers know that if they do not buy the item they want, they may miss out on an opportunity.

The very short time from when a fashion trend is featured on the catwalk or seen on popular figures to when it can be found on the shelves. 

Hundreds of styles covering all the latest trends.

 Production in third countries with cheap labour, without real rights and security, complex supply chains without transparency and visibility beyond the first link in the chain.

 

 

Cheap, low-quality materials such as polyester, which cause clothes to degrade after they have been worn a few times. Then they are quickly disposed of – not to mention the release of microfibres.

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